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Our New Location.

Mac & PC Doctors has moved to a bigger and better location just five minutes from our previous Annerley one. This location will allow us to expand our company and be able to offer you more when it comes to technological training and MPD Accessibility offerings.
If you are wanting to come visit us, see the videos and images below that outline multiple routes.

This video shows you how to get to our new Rocklea location if you are coming from the City along Ipswich Road.

 

How to get to our new location if you are coming along Fairfield Road from Brisbane City.

 

General Directions To 7/1311 Ipswich Road, Rocklea

 

 

 

 

 

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Autism Awareness Month

As April comes to an end, so does Autism Awareness Month marked from Autism Awareness Day on April 2nd.
This month aims to bring focus to the thousands of people who receive an autism diagnosis every year as well as raise awareness and acceptance for autism.
 
However, even though there are just a few days left in April and therefore Autism Awareness Month, we at Mac & PC Doctors have correlated some standout articles and events that a worth your time.
 
In light of this month, Autism Parenting Magazine released an incredibly comprehensive list of around 100 apps to download on iPhone, iPad and Android devices. These apps assist those who are on the spectrum with educating themselves on autism as well as improving their ability to learn with engaging games.
 
Check out this list here:
 
 
Queensland association ‘Go Blue for Autism’ has again partnered with Warner Bros. Movie World to offer early access to the park for guests with Autism Spectrum Disorder on Sunday 29th of April. Guests with ASD will receive free entry to the park from 8:30 am. See below to read more about this event.
 
 
If you want to purchase some merchandise like water bottles, keep cups, t-shirts and more to show your support for ‘Go Blue for Autism’ head to:
 
 
If you are concerned about your child or would like a bit more clarity surrounding autism, head to Autism Awareness Australia.
 
 
 
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Apple’s Proposed New Disability Emojis.

Apple proposed 13 new emojis to the Unicode Consortium in March in an attempt to expand their emoji’s representation of all people. They have presented emojis featuring accessibility-related instruments such as prosthetic limbs and hearing aids. As well as depicting people who suffer from deafness or troubled hearing, low vision or blindness along with disabilities like PTSD, anxiety and autism. 

Unicode is a not-for-profit organisation that reviews emoji proposals. 

In their proposal, Apple wrote, “At Apple, we believe that technology should be accessible to everyone and should provide an experience that serves individual needs.” They continued by saying, “at Apple, we believe that technology should be accessible to everyone and should provide an experience that serves individual needs. Adding emoji emblematic to users’ life experiences helps foster a diverse culture that is inclusive of disability.”

Apple worked with the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, the National Association of the Deaf and the American Council of the Blind to develop these emojis that are being proposed to the Unicode Consortium. 

With only one current disability emoji existing on IOS devices; the wheelchair symbol, it is clear to see why there is a need to introduce more inclusive emojis.

These are just some of the emojis which are being proposed by Apple :  

 

If these emojis are approved by Unicode, they will begin appearing in updates on Apple devices in the second-half of 2019. 

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Can I automate my whole house with Apple HomeKit?

It’s certainly preferable to be able to control all of your accessories through one platform or app. Unfortunately, we in Australia are still waiting for some of the accessories which are already available in the US to be adapted to suit Australian electricity plugs and voltages.

Elgato Eve offers lighting and temperature control products. The Thermo and Light Switch products are not available in Australia.

Air conditioners, blinds, gates and garage doors which are themselves wifi enabled to use with a generic app are also are not yet available here. A way around that would be to plug them in to a switch such as the Eve Energy. It will control any electrical device which is plugged into it.

A product such as this blind from Luxaflex has its own app and apparently Luxaflex in the US have promised HomeKit compatibility this year so that may mean it’s not too far behind for Australia .

SwannOne has a great range of cameras but they use their own app, not HomeKit. D-Link has just brought out a HomeKit compatible camera  but there is only the one model at this stage.

We can recommend and supply Schlage Sense Smart Deadbolt which is HomeKit compatible which can be locked and unlocked using either the app, a key or a code.

While the number of HomeKit compatible products is growing all the time, it is still not really possible to get everything on one app. If you can’t wait to start automating your home, maybe you could think about planning ahead to be easily able to change over when new products become available.

We are able to assist you with consultancy services to advise on and set up iOS-controlled automation accessories. We are able to supply Elgato Eve, SwannOne, Schlage and D-Link products. Please find attached a list of the Elgato and SwannOne products. These products and services may be able to be purchased using NDIS funding, depending on what is included in your plan.

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What can I buy with NDIS low risk assistive technology funding?

Information from the NDIS on AT

This information at this link from the NDIS explains the levels of classification of assistive technology.  Whether funding is given for a particular higher cost item will depend on the participant’s goals and the assessor’s decision.

In many cases, participants are given an amount of up to $1021 (correct as of January 2018) to purchase items that are considered low risk.  It is up to the participant’s discretion how they spend that money, of course always bearing in mind that that items purchased with NDIS funding must:

 

  • comply with the general criteria for supports outlined in rule 5.1 of the Supports for Participants Rules;
  • not fall within a category of supports that will not be funded or provided under rule 5.3 of the Supports for Participants Rules;
  • assist the participant to pursue the goals, objectives and aspirations included in the participant’s statement of goals and aspirations;
  • assist the participant to undertake activities, so as to facilitate the participant’s social or economic participation;
  • represent value for money in that the costs of the support are reasonable, relative to both the benefits achieved and the cost of alternative support;
  • effective and beneficial for the participant, having regard to current good practice;
  • takes account of what it is reasonable to expect families, carers, informal networks and the community to provide; and
  • be most appropriately funded or provided through the NDIS, and not more appropriately funded or provided through other service systems.

As outlined in the AT Complexity Classification document, the NDIA recognises some AT as low cost, low risk (Category 1) and participants who have AT identified in their plan will generally have funding in that plan for them to directly purchase a modest amount of this AT that is integral to meeting their plan goals.

The Daily Adaptive Equipment (03_131_0103_1_1) line item under a participant’s CORE budget (Consumables support category) would be where they would claim these expenses. (NDIS document)

What we can offer

That said, here are items which we as an NDIS Registered Provider can supply under the NDIS if funding has been approved and the above criteria are met:

Contact us by emailing accessibility@macandpcdoctors.com.au with further questions or if you would like to arrange a service booking.