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What can I buy with NDIS low risk assistive technology funding?

Information from the NDIS on AT

This information at this link from the NDIS explains the levels of classification of assistive technology.  Whether funding is given for a particular higher cost item will depend on the participant’s goals and the assessor’s decision.

In many cases, participants are given an amount of up to $1021 (correct as of January 2018) to purchase items that are considered low risk.  It is up to the participant’s discretion how they spend that money, of course always bearing in mind that that items purchased with NDIS funding must:

 

  • comply with the general criteria for supports outlined in rule 5.1 of the Supports for Participants Rules;
  • not fall within a category of supports that will not be funded or provided under rule 5.3 of the Supports for Participants Rules;
  • assist the participant to pursue the goals, objectives and aspirations included in the participant’s statement of goals and aspirations;
  • assist the participant to undertake activities, so as to facilitate the participant’s social or economic participation;
  • represent value for money in that the costs of the support are reasonable, relative to both the benefits achieved and the cost of alternative support;
  • effective and beneficial for the participant, having regard to current good practice;
  • takes account of what it is reasonable to expect families, carers, informal networks and the community to provide; and
  • be most appropriately funded or provided through the NDIS, and not more appropriately funded or provided through other service systems.

As outlined in the AT Complexity Classification document, the NDIA recognises some AT as low cost, low risk (Category 1) and participants who have AT identified in their plan will generally have funding in that plan for them to directly purchase a modest amount of this AT that is integral to meeting their plan goals.

The Daily Adaptive Equipment (03_131_0103_1_1) line item under a participant’s CORE budget (Consumables support category) would be where they would claim these expenses. (NDIS document)

What we can offer

That said, here are items which we as an NDIS Registered Provider can supply under the NDIS if funding has been approved and the above criteria are met:

Contact us by emailing accessibility@macandpcdoctors.com.au with further questions or if you would like to arrange a service booking.

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Can I buy an iPad with NDIS funding?

Can I buy an iPad with NDIS funding?

Will the NDIS fund an iPad?

Like many things to do with the NDIS, the answer is not necessarily a simple yes or no. A recent update from the NDIS seemed to say outright that iPads are generally not approved because they are considered mainstream devices. People who have already been through the process of applying for NDIS have had mixed experiences – some have had iPads approved and some haven’t.

How do you get assistive technology under the NDIS?

An NDIS plan might have the following category of funding for assistive technology:

Support Purpose Outcomes Framework Domain Support Category
Capital Daily Living Assistive Technology

 

The Assistive Technology Support Category is designed for larger ticket items like wheelchairs, hoists and speech generating devices and also mainstream devices such as iPads where the NDIA planner determines it to be a reasonable and necessary support.

 

The first step is to arrange for an OT to complete and assistive technology assessment.  The templates can be found at the following link https://ndis.gov.au/providers/at/assessing-at.html#template

Once the assistive technology assessment is submitted, if the planner approves the device for the participant,  funding will be made available in the Assistive Technology budget to purchase the piece of equipment.

Read more about AT under the NDIS here.

A standard size 5th generation iPad ranges in price from $469 to $799, depending on the features.

The entry level iPad 5 costs $469

Samsung tablets start from as little as $199 for a 7 inch 8GB WiFi model to $849 for a 9.7 inch 64GB WiFi and 4G model.

If your occupational therapist, physiotherapist, speech pathologist or other adviser thinks that an iPad or tablet, smart phone or smart watch would be useful for you, then you can start the process of finding a provider and asking them to put in a request via the NDIS portal.  Ask your allied health professional to write the recommendation in an official report and keep that report in case you are audited by the NDIS in the future.

NDIS funding has also been used by participants to purchase extended warranty on their device, protective cases and iTunes vouchers for purchasing relevant apps.

What if I’m not sure how to use an iPad to support me achieve my goals?

There are people and organisations who can help you with how to use your new device.  Some OTs are very proficient with assistive technology as are some support workers.  Our staff can also help you. Email us on accessibility@macandpcdoctors.com.au or ring us on 07 3892 2227.

What should I make sure is on my NDIS plan?

For a tablet, smartphone or smartwatch, make sure you have funding for Assistive Technology under Capital.

For support and training, apply for funding for Innovative Community Participation under Capacity Building.

An iPad can support a person with a disability in many ways
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How to use the iPad as an Assistive Technology device

Recently our accessibility team was approached by the Queensland-Government-funded Community Care Smart AT Collaborative with a request to present some webinars on assistive technology use with Apple devices.

Check out the Community Care Smart AT Collaborative’s portal which is designed as a place for training, information-sharing and collaboration on smart assistive technology and is open for anyone interested to register and use.

Please find below the two webinars presented so far.

The iPad: A Powerful Smart Assistive Technology

 

The iPad: How this Device can Assist Individuals with Vision Impairment

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Accessibility features in Apple devices

Apple features accessibility in all devices
Apple features accessibility in all devices

Apple designs products like iPads and iPhones with assistive features that allow people with disabilities to access the functions of Apple devices to increase their capabilities. These innovative technologies are built in iOS devices to make them powerful. Apple provides a set of tutorials explaining how to use the accessibility features. Assistive technology ensures accessibility of iOS devices to the aged, disabled and even blind. Apple accessibility features include:

Siri

vision_siriThis is Apple’s intelligent virtual assistant. It helps you do with your daily schedule. All you have to do to get its help is ask. It can send messages, leaves voicemails, turn VoiceOver on and off and schedule meetings. It can access all the other apps in an Apple device. All you have to do is give a directive which is something like “Remind me of my meeting on Sunday 10 am”.

Voiceover

This is a screen reader that helps you navigate on your iPhone or iPad screen even if you cannot see.

Speak Screen

Having a hard time reading texts on your screen? You can use speak screen to read your books or emails. You send a command to Siri to turn on Speak Screen for you and have all your documents read to you. It has features such as highlighting, adjusting speaking rate and changing voice dialect.

FaceTime

FaceTime video calls lets you catch every gesture and facial expression. It enables you to communicate in many ways. FaceTime is very useful to people who cannot speak. It is a high quality video with a fast frame rate. All Apple devices are equipped with FaceTime.

Hearing Aids for iPhone and iPad

Apple has collaborated with manufacturers who have designed hearing aids. They are efficient with a very high quality audio experience to help you have a wonderful iPhone or iPad experience.