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GPS trackers

New tracker called Magpie

We recently contributed to the Kickstarter campaign for a tracking device called Magpie.

A new GPS tracking device

Lots of people ask about a good tracking device for children with autism or elderly people with dementia that can be connected to a carer’s smartphone.  There are plenty of products on the market but some of the reported problems with them are:

  • Bulky and obvious – wearer may take it off
  • Some can be “locked” on but this may be too intrusive to the wearer from a sensory or comfort point of view
  • The range is small – no good for out and about in a public place
  • The lag between the wearer leaving the prescribed area and the alert arriving on the carer’s phone is too long
  • The battery life or the life of the device itself is too short
  • The device is expensive
  • It requires a data plan which is expensive

What’s so good about Magpie?

The Magpie designers claim to have solved all those problems.  Fingers crossed! Here’s what they say:

Magpie is the most affordable, truly global tracker. Others out there are either Bluetooth-powered with short reach, or expensive and theoretical. We’re also set up with a subscription-based service, so there is no cost for the device and the cost of the GPS service is significantly less.

Magpie’s battery is rechargeable, so you’ll never run out of juice.

On a single charge Magpie will last anywhere from 1 day to 3 months depending on the tracking frequency you’ve put in place; by the minute, by the hour, by the day.

Magpie is waterproof, dustproof and designed to withstand anything daily life throws at it.

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Apps for Autism

April is Autism Awareness Month.  

Many people with autism find assistive technology hugely beneficial for all sorts of purposes. Some people use dedicated speech generating devices but many use a mainstream device such as an iPad and install apps which fall broadly into the categories of:

  • communication
  • social skills
  • emotional regulation
  • learning
  • academic and work

There are a couple of really good Australian resources to help parents, carers and therapists to make good choices about apps.  See our earlier post on choosing apps.

Bronwyn Sutton of BEST Autism Therapy has created a very comprehensive guide which she updates constantly.

Craig Smith of Autism Pedagogy has a blog post here with an overview of useful apps.

If you are just starting the iPad journey, you will want to think about:

  • goals for iPad use
  • size and memory capability
  • protection with a good case
  • wifi and cellular or wifi only
  • training for user, carers and therapists